image border bottom

Outdoor Events

October 08, 2012 Author: admin Category: Slide  0 Comments

Planning an outdoor event, whether it is for the beautiful weather or the beautiful view, can present a number of logistical challenges. The number one rule in planning an outdoor event is to plan ahead.

Here are some challenges and considerations:

  • Permits

Permits may be required for some needs, such as setting up a structure.
Check with your city, state, parks department or township for requirements.

  • Insects

Are bugs going to be an issue? How are you going to protect your guests?

  • Power

How are you going to power your event? Will you need to bring in generators?

  • Restrooms

Can guests use nearby restrooms or do you need to rent portable restrooms?
Modern portable restrooms can include air conditioning, and automatic faucets.

  • Parking

Are guests going to be able to park in close proximity to your outdoor event?

  • Staging and Seating

Will you need to rent tents, tables, chairs, risers, bleachers, flooring, etc.?
What needs to be covered for decoration? How does this affect the lighting and sightlines?

  • Safety

Pay attention to any safety or security regulations required by various rental partners.
How will wind, rain or nature affect the safety of your guests?
Take precautions to ensure the safety of your guests in high temperatures or direct sunlight.

  • Heating and Cooling

Will it be too hot or cold for your guests to be comfortable? Consider renting heating or cooling units.

  • Added Costs

It can be costly to bring in all of these extras that may already exist in an indoor venue, such as power, flooring and restrooms.

 

Integrating Social Media Into Your Event

October 01, 2012 Author: admin Category: Slide  0 Comments

“How do I integrate social media into our event?”

  1. The first step should be setting up an event on both Facebook and LinkedIn. This allows Facebook and LinkedIn users to search for events pertaining to information they are seeking.
  2. Create a community by incentivizing people to utilize your Facebook page or to tweet about your event. For example: The first re-tweet or the Facebook photo with the most “likes” wins a prize.
  3. Set up a Twitter hashtag (#) for your event. You can also display this hashtag at your event, such as on TV screens with live Twitter feeds.
  4. Use Twitter to tag (@) speakers at your event. This creates cross-promotion by bringing someone else in the conversation.
  5. Ask questions on Twitter. This is a great way to shape your event. You can get live feedback from the listeners/followers about what they want; what information they’re looking for. You can then use this to shape the sessions, the speakers, etc.
  6. Set up a dashboard (such as TweetDeck or HootSuite) to keep track of all your social media accounts. These sites allow you to watch what people are saying: You may be able to respond in real-time.

“What are the advantages of using social media sites to promote my event?”

  1. Facebook and LinkedIn events are a great way to quickly and effectively communicate the who/what/when/where/why of your event.
  2. Guests can RSVP that they are going and strike up conversations with other event guests.

“What should I take into consideration when using social media to promote my event?”

  1. These online event pages cannot be used for registration, nor can you accept fees, so they should not be your only source of promotion.
  2. Take advantage of as many social media sites as possible to reach the largest audience. You cannot rely on social media to do all of your event promotion for you.
  3. Consider what type of event it is. Formal events should still use printed invitations.
  4. Don’t set up the event page and let it sit. Make sure you update the page frequently.

The Power of Webcasts

September 24, 2012 Author: admin Category: Slide  0 Comments

The Power of Webcasts

Web technology has certainly advanced the ability of marketers to reach their target audience. Think of the last time you used technology in your business. For many of you, webcasting has not come to mind, but the process of broadcasting events live can be more efficient than Facebook and Twitter combined.

Let’s talk about the various roles webcasting can actually possess if used correctly. Possibilities really are endless with webcasting since events can be streamed to the audience and promote real time communication. An RSS Feed can also be provided on the side of a stream to develop communication between everyone interested in the event. Furthermore, the feed can initiate a certain buzz that can only truly be seen from the live showing, thus revenue would not be lost at all. A webcast serves as an enhancing factor to the event.

Webcasting with Technisch Creative links the sponsors to the events flawlessly.  There are numerous ways for sponsors to utilize non-invasive advertising, such as Ticker Messages, WV Bugs, and On-Screen Graphics.  Technisch Creative’s webcasting technology also allows for traditional advertising such as commercial spots.

Another important element is how webcasting can allow your organization to understand an audience from a marketing analytics standpoint. Technisch Creative can track viewers, giving information such as e-mails, names, and other contact information with webcasting technology. This can help you know who is interested in future events and allows the opportunity to have any message tailored specifically to your audience.

 

How to Use a Microphone

July 18, 2012 Author: admin Category: Slide  0 Comments

There will come a time in most peoples lives that they will have to work with a microphone. And when I say work with, I mean speak into a microphone. This can cause some serious problems for those that are shy or suffer from abject terror at the mere idea of standing before an audience of more than, say, the family pet. If you are in fact on of these people, or just someone who could use a little help making better presentations, this article should make the process easier and hopefully less painful

The first step in the process is to rehearse ahead of time whenever possible. If you’re at a wedding reception and are put on the spot, rehearsal is not an option. So just relax and think happy thoughts. Thoughts like “Hey! There’s an open bar waiting for me after I’m finished” or “I so can’t wait to get my hands on the Best Man’s throat after he’s had a few drinks.” Having said that, let’s get back to preparation. The more comfortable you are with your material, the easier it will be to incorporate the aforementioned technology.

Since I brought up the subject of technology, now is a good time for a terminology primer. When working with microphones, you will sound way cooler if you can use the correct terms when communicating with the technical folks. The most common type of microphone is of the hand held variety. This is what you hold, in your hand, when speaking. The hand held can be either wired (meaning with a cord) or wireless (using radio frequencies to transmit the sound to a receiver). So far so good? The second most used microphone is a lapel microphone, also called a lavaliere, lav, or clip-on mic. This is what you wear attached to a tie , shirt, jacket,  or lapel, hence the name. This microphone will usually be small and unobtrusive. The lavaliere can also be wired or wireless. If wireless, it will be attached to a (hopefully) small body pack that holds the batteries and transmitter.

Hiring an Event Management Partner

July 18, 2012 Author: admin Category: Slide  0 Comments

So you’ve decided to have an event, and you’re not sure whether or not you need professional assistance. A good event management company should be an asset to your event, not a liability. They will bring knowledge and experience to the table which can help you save time and money. But not all event managers are created equal. Here are a few tips to help you find the right professional.

Ask about their experience. Event planning sounds like a glamorous job, which is one reason why event planning and management companies are popping up all over the world. However, there is no licensing or education required for one to call themselves an event planner, so ask to see examples of past jobs. And if they have beautiful pictures to show you, make sure they explain what their involvement was in the event pictured. Did they actually manage the event, or were they a volunteer helping with a small portion of the event?

Ask for references and follow up with them. It’s invaluable to find out what a past client’s experience was like. Make sure that you get a list of past client references and not personal references. Also, does the company have a list of repeat clientele? Consider checking with these clients, because repeat business is a testament to the quality of their work.

Ask about the company’s relationship with venues that you are considering for your event. An experienced professional should be able to work in most environments, but it can be an added bonus if they are experienced working with a particular venue. This can help save you a lot of time and expense with labor scheduling, site visits, and any union issues that could arise.

Ask how the company will charge for their service. Is it an hourly charge or is it a percentage of the event? Are they contracting and paying the vendors or will you be responsible for payments? If the company is responsible for paying the vendors, do they have good credit terms? If they are not responsible for contracting and paying the vendors, you will need to make sure that each vendor is properly licensed and insured.

Ask if the company owns/operates their own equipment. Some event management companies are able to provide services such as audio/visual production, decor, rentals, etc. in house, which may help reduce the end price. If they do not own or operate the equipment themselves, find out who are their partners in service.

Ask about the company’s network. Do they have access to unique ideas and services for your event? Are they current on industry trends?

Ask the name of the individual on staff that will be in charge of your event. After the contract is signed, will you work with an event coordinator throughout the process? Will that individual be on site for the event? If there is an intern or assistant coordinating the details during the planning phase, how are they being supervised?

Ask if they will be responsible for assuring the load out and clean up will be completed according to the facility’s requirements. Every event has an ending, and the clean up is an important part of the production. There may be fees involved if anything is left behind, so someone needs to be in charge to be sure the job is complete.

Ask for an example of how they’ve handled an emergency. If there’s one thing all experienced event managers will agree on, it’s that things never go exactly as planned. A good event manager will be able to analyze the situation and make quick, informed decisions to keep the event on track. The ability to make good decisions is what makes a good event manager great.