image border bottom

The Power of Webcasts

September 24, 2016 Author: admin Category: Event Planner Tips  0 Comments

The Power of Webcasts

Web technology has certainly advanced the ability of marketers to reach their target audience. Think of the last time you used technology in your business. For many of you, webcasting has not come to mind, but the process of broadcasting events live can be more efficient than Facebook and Twitter combined.

Let’s talk about the various roles webcasting can actually possess if used correctly. Possibilities really are endless with webcasting since events can be streamed to the audience and promote real time communication. An RSS Feed can also be provided on the side of a stream to develop communication between everyone interested in the event. Furthermore, the feed can initiate a certain buzz that can only truly be seen from the live showing, thus revenue would not be lost at all. A webcast serves as an enhancing factor to the event.

Webcasting with Technisch Creative links the sponsors to the events flawlessly.  There are numerous ways for sponsors to utilize non-invasive advertising, such as Ticker Messages, WV Bugs, and On-Screen Graphics.  Technisch Creative’s webcasting technology also allows for traditional advertising such as commercial spots.

Another important element is how webcasting can allow your organization to understand an audience from a marketing analytics standpoint. Technisch Creative can track viewers, giving information such as e-mails, names, and other contact information with webcasting technology. This can help you know who is interested in future events and allows the opportunity to have any message tailored specifically to your audience.

 

Make Waves

January 20, 2016 Author: admin Category: Event Planner Tips  0 Comments

The Free Dictionary says to Make Waves means to shock or upset people with something new or different and to change an existing situation in a way which causes problems or upsets people. At Technisch Creative, we think to Make Waves means to keep changing the way you do events so your audience stays engaged and also, to give your event’s mission a voice outside of the parameters of time. Like a ripple. Like a sound wave. A wave of emotion. We encourage you to be brave…Make Waves.

 

Integrating Social Media Into Your Event

October 01, 2015 Author: admin Category: Event Planner Tips  0 Comments

“How do I integrate social media into our event?”

  1. The first step should be setting up an event on both Facebook and LinkedIn. This allows Facebook and LinkedIn users to search for events pertaining to information they are seeking.
  2. Create a community by incentivizing people to utilize your Facebook page or to tweet about your event. For example: The first re-tweet or the Facebook photo with the most “likes” wins a prize.
  3. Set up a Twitter hashtag (#) for your event. You can also display this hashtag at your event, such as on TV screens with live Twitter feeds.
  4. Use Twitter to tag (@) speakers at your event. This creates cross-promotion by bringing someone else in the conversation.
  5. Ask questions on Twitter. This is a great way to shape your event. You can get live feedback from the listeners/followers about what they want; what information they’re looking for. You can then use this to shape the sessions, the speakers, etc.
  6. Set up a dashboard (such as TweetDeck or HootSuite) to keep track of all your social media accounts. These sites allow you to watch what people are saying: You may be able to respond in real-time.

“What are the advantages of using social media sites to promote my event?”

  1. Facebook and LinkedIn events are a great way to quickly and effectively communicate the who/what/when/where/why of your event.
  2. Guests can RSVP that they are going and strike up conversations with other event guests.

“What should I take into consideration when using social media to promote my event?”

  1. These online event pages cannot be used for registration, nor can you accept fees, so they should not be your only source of promotion.
  2. Take advantage of as many social media sites as possible to reach the largest audience. You cannot rely on social media to do all of your event promotion for you.
  3. Consider what type of event it is. Formal events should still use printed invitations.
  4. Don’t set up the event page and let it sit. Make sure you update the page frequently.

The Cost of Hiring a Pro

July 18, 2015 Author: admin Category: Event Planner Tips, Event Production Tips  0 Comments

Can you plan your own events? Probably so. Then why do you need the services of a professional meeting planner? You don’t. That being said, please accept my challenge:

I guarantee what you’ll find will be of interest to you every time you need to make a business decision requiring your commitment of a large block of time. You need a calculator and a pencil. Stop here and return when you’re ready to churn some numbers.

Ok, first off, take YOUR yearly gross salary, then multiply it by 30% and add the two numbers. (For example if you earn $100,000 multiply it by 30%) $30,000) then add the two numbers = $130,000)

Now, divide the total number reached above by 2000. The number you see here is YOUR approximate hourly wage ($65)

Now, this is an interesting number but the equation isn’t over yet. Part two is a bit more subjective.

Ask yourself:

  • What am I presently working on?
  • How much revenue do I derive yearly for my firm or organization?
  • What major projects take up most of my focus?
  • Am I working on a highly visible tangible project such as a new contract, the move of a building or headquarters, the purchase of another company or perhaps an IPO?

If so, ask yourself: “what is the real cost of diluting my focus on these issues?”

Now, in order to complete the equation let’s turn to your event. The one common denominator that transcends the planning of every event or meeting is time. There is of course, the time between today’s date and the actual date of your event. There is the time you must invest in order to produce a world-class event. The two are without a doubt interrelated yet very different. The primary focus of this article is on you and the amount of time you’re able to commit to the planning and execution of an event. There is no getting around it –proper planning takes time and always more than meets the eye.

My argument here, respectfully submitted for your understanding, is that more than likely you can’t afford not to use a professional planner and the numbers truly tell the story. A simplistic comparison: taking one’s clothes to the cleaners. Can I wash and iron them myself? Sure can! But the cost per shirt is nominal for professional laundering when I consider the time I’d have to invest in order to accomplish the same task myself.

Time is money. We’ve heard this over and over again throughout our careers. Why do you think corporations spend millions maintaining fleets of private aircraft? They are not executive perks; they carry busy professionals who don’t have time to waste, men and women whose contribution to the bottom line of their company far exceeds the cost of maintaining executive aircraft.

From another perspective – if you’ve ever had the opportunity to put together a toy or kitchen gadget on a holiday morning, I am sure you can relate to the following point: People who do something over and over again, do it more quickly and efficiently!

In my opinion, that is the best case for using professional planners for your event. In addition to having their ear to the ground about venues, industry issues, etc., they know what “not to do.” They know the risks involved in certain decisions and can clearly see danger well ahead of others who plan meetings from “time to time.”

Returning to my original statement, you are more than likely capable of planning your own event and most probably could do it well, but unless you do it all the time, you’re not going to have access to the information and knowledge base of someone who lives the craft professionally and in most cases, socially as well.

Using our equation model, what is the real cost of your total involvement for countless hours on end? I believe, significantly higher than of a professional planner.

Numbers do tell the story and the model I’ve suggested here today can be used in other areas of your business and personal life as well.

Copyright 2000. Avery Russell, Alexandria, VA, USA. Reproduction permitted.

Outdoor Events

October 08, 2014 Author: admin Category: Event Planner Tips, Event Production Tips  0 Comments

Planning an outdoor event, whether it is for the beautiful weather or the beautiful view, can present a number of logistical challenges. The number one rule in planning an outdoor event is to plan ahead.

Here are some challenges and considerations:

  • Permits

Permits may be required for some needs, such as setting up a structure.
Check with your city, state, parks department or township for requirements.

  • Insects

Are bugs going to be an issue? How are you going to protect your guests?

  • Power

How are you going to power your event? Will you need to bring in generators?

  • Restrooms

Can guests use nearby restrooms or do you need to rent portable restrooms?
Modern portable restrooms can include air conditioning, and automatic faucets.

  • Parking

Are guests going to be able to park in close proximity to your outdoor event?

  • Staging and Seating

Will you need to rent tents, tables, chairs, risers, bleachers, flooring, etc.?
What needs to be covered for decoration? How does this affect the lighting and sightlines?

  • Safety

Pay attention to any safety or security regulations required by various rental partners.
How will wind, rain or nature affect the safety of your guests?
Take precautions to ensure the safety of your guests in high temperatures or direct sunlight.

  • Heating and Cooling

Will it be too hot or cold for your guests to be comfortable? Consider renting heating or cooling units.

  • Added Costs

It can be costly to bring in all of these extras that may already exist in an indoor venue, such as power, flooring and restrooms.